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August 19, 2022

Study Suggests Link Between Tylenol and Autism

By T. Thompson In Featured, Latest News with Comments Off on Study Suggests Link Between Tylenol and Autism

ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY…
1942: World War II – Over 4,000 Canadian and British soldiers were killed, wounded, or captured raiding Dieppe, France.

An increasing number of lawsuits are being filed over an alleged link between pregnant women using acetaminophen during pregnancy and their child developing autism.

Women who used acetaminophen such as Tylenol during pregnancy and their child was later diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder may qualify for a lawsuit to seek financial compensation.

Studies suggest acetaminophen exposure (i.e., Tylenol, Excedrin, Dayquil, or Nyquil) in pregnancy linked to a higher risk of autism

A study funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality found that exposure to acetaminophen in the womb may increase a child’s risk for autism spectrum disorder. 

The researchers found that children whose cord blood samples contained the highest acetaminophen levels were roughly three times more likely to be diagnosed with autism.

In a separate study published in the European Journal of Epidemiology, researchers from the University of Barcelona in Spain also found a potential link between the use of acetaminophen by pregnant women and their child developing autism.

The researchers examined data from more than 73,000 mother-child pairs across Europe, finding that children exposed to acetaminophen in the womb were 19% more likely to be on the autism spectrum.

Injured parties must prove that they used acetaminophen while pregnant and that their child was diagnosed with autism, which could be a complex process. Effective legal expertise will be necessary in this case.

You can get more information about how to file a claim or if you are eligible at the prenatal acetaminophen/autism lawsuit webpage.


Sources: NIH | European Journal of Epidemiology | JAMA Psychiatry

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